DIY Upcycle & Recycle: Designing Shoulder Cutouts

DIY Upcycle & Recycle: Designing Shoulder Cutouts

How to Design and Sew Shoulder Cutouts

Spring cleaning time again and I have a stack of clothing items that I haven’t worn in a LONG time. You know the rule, if you haven’t worn the item in 2 years, it has to go!  What happens if you love the fabric, the print, or even just the buttons? Why not recycle or upcycle the items into something I might actually wear!  Here is an upcycle project for spring and summer and it’s right on trend … adding shoulder cutouts to a button down shirt.

Let’s Get Started!

Lay the shirt flat.  Locate the top of the shoulder and outside arm. Measure along the shoulder seam from the neck edge to where you want the edge of the hole to start.  In my case I am going to start 2” to 3” from the neckline.

With a fabric marking pen, mark the top opening of the hole at the shoulder position.
Mark the bottom of the hole opening. Choose a spot above the elbow along the outside edge of the sleeve.
Draw an oval like the one I have here.  The oval doesn’t have to be perfect, just free-hand draw the curve.  Keep in mind this includes the ½” seam allowance, so if you think you need a smaller opening after sewing draw a smaller oval.
Cut along the markings.

For the full tutorial, check out my post on the Brother Stitching Sewcial blog.  I always love to see what your are working on, be sure to share photos of your upcycles shirt using #angelawolf #brothersews

Cheers,

Brother Expert Sewing Consultant. This blog post may contain affiliate links.

DIY Upcycle & Recycle 2 Denim Shirts into 1 Dress

DIY Upcycle & Recycle 2 Denim Shirts into 1 Dress

Upcycle Denim Shirts

My husband was cleaning out his closet and handed me a couple of denim shirts to donate.  I couldn’t help but notice the logo on one of the shirts from a marina we frequent on our summer boating trips – I couldn’t bear to allow that one to go.  A friend mentioned making a quilt, but I don’t foresee that on the shortlist anytime soon.  Then it occurred to me – UPCYCLE!  I do need a sundress for the boating season and what better than a couple of denim shirts to play with!

Supplies

Let’s Get Started – Designing the Tank!

Try on the shirt and check the fit. Start by marking the width of the desired tank onto the shoulder seam

 

As I am holding up this sleeve, notice how wide the top is and how low the armscye falls. This will all be changed J

Measure from the back of the neck to your natural waistline and draw a line. Measure on the front of the top as well.

From the waist marking, measure down an additional 3” and place another mark.  (I am adding the 3” to allow a little blousing when the dress is belted).  Measure down another ½” to allow for a seam allowance.

Next, draw a line from the underarm seam up to the shoulder mark as shown.

For the full tutorial, check out my post on the Brother Stitching Sewcial blog.  I always love to see what you are working on, be sure to share photos of your upcycled shirts using hashtags #angelawolf #brothersews

Cheers,

Brother Expert Sewing Consultant. This blog post may contain affiliate links.

DIY Upcycle & Recycle: Designing Shoulder Cutouts

How to Design and Sew Shoulder Cutouts Spring cleaning time again and I have a stack of clothing items that I haven't worn in a LONG time. You know the rule, if you haven't worn the item in 2 years, it has to go!  What happens if you love the fabric, the print, or...

read more

DIY Upcycle & Recycle 2 Denim Shirts into 1 Dress

Upcycle Denim Shirts My husband was cleaning out his closet and handed me a couple of denim shirts to donate.  I couldn’t help but notice the logo on one of the shirts from a marina we frequent on our summer boating trips – I couldn’t bear to allow that one to go.  A...

read more

Fringe Skirt Sewalong Part 4: Sewing & Fitting Darts

Darts have a unique role in clothing.  The obvious reason for adding darts would be for fitting purposes, but they are also used as a design element.  After you try on your muslin, you might find that you need to add additional darts to the front or back waist - this...

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Fringe Skirt Sewalong Part 2: Fitting & Altering Skirt Patterns

Fringe Skirt Sewalong Part 2: Fitting & Altering Skirt Patterns

Record Your Measurements


Waist: this is your natural waist measurement and you can find this by bending sideway slightly and you will feel the indentation at the waistline

High Hip or Fullest Part of Stomach: somewhere between the natural waistline and hips, it’s different in each of us depending on our body shape

Hips: measure hips at the fullest part

Length: from waistline to where you want skirt to be hemmed – take this measuring from the center front of your body

 

Compare Your Measurements to the Pattern


If you look closely on the pattern front you will see two circles with some numbers (shown above). These represent the exact measurements of that specific area when the garment is completed.  For the fringe skirt you will find the exact waist measurement and exact hip measurement.  Use this as a guide when choosing the size of pattern to start with.  Take your hip and waist measurements, add the amount of ease (I prefer 1″ to 2″ for this style when using non-stretch fabric), and use this measurement to choose the size on the pattern to start with.

Adjusting the Length


This skirt can be any length you want!  To shorten or lengthen follow the steps below.  If you need to lengthen or shorten the pattern in the hip or stomach area, follow the same steps, but draw the line across the pattern in the area that needs adjusting..

  1. Draw a line across the pattern below the hips, parallel to the grainline. Cut across the line and spread the pattern the amount you want to lengthen.

2.  Add paper to the pattern to fill the gap and true the seam lines. To make the skirt shorter, fold the pattern along the pink line.

Adjusting the Entire Pattern Larger or Smaller


This pattern goes up to a size 16. If you want to alter the pattern for a size larger than 16, determine the amount that needs to be added to the pattern.  Let’s say we need to add 4” to the overall width.  This will mean we need to add 2” to the front and 2” to the back.  (To make the pattern smaller, follow the same steps and instead of spreading the pattern at the designated areas, decrease the amount as needed.)

 

  1.  Draw a line from the waist to the hem, parallel to the grainline on the front #1 pattern piece.

2. Cut along the pink line and spread the pattern 1” (the pattern is on the fold, by adding 1” we are really adding 2” to the entire front piece.  Do the same for the front lining #3 pattern piece, back pattern piece #2, and back lining piece #4.

Adjust the waistband the same way.  Keeping with the example for an overall 4” adjustment:

  • Waistband Pattern #5 – spread pattern 4”
  • Waistband Pattern #6 – spread pattern 2”
  • Fringe Trim Pattern #7 – spread pattern 2”

 

 

Adjusting the Pattern for a Round Tummy


If you try on the muslin of the skirt pattern and its too tight in the stomach area and the hemline rides higher in the front than the back, this is the pattern alteration for you.  The changes will add width and length to the pattern in the area needed.

This is the same alteration that would be used for the back pattern piece if you need more room in the tush 🙂

  1. Draw a line across the pattern (in the stomach area) as shown.

3. Cut into the dart area, leaving a hinge at the edge of the first line. Depending on how much the pattern will be extended, you might need to cut a second dart area as shown.

2. Cut across the line, leaving a hinge at the waistline.

4. Spread out the darts until the center front is parallel to the grainline.

5. True the waistline and draw a new center front line, using the top pattern piece as the guide. The amount extended will need to be added to the waistband and fringe pattern pieces.

These are some common pattern alterations needed for the fringe skirt pattern. Be sure to join the Angela Wolf Patterns Facebook group to share photos, ask questions, and click here to be notified by email when each blog post goes up for the Fringe skirt sewalong!

Cheers,

The Fringe Skirt Sewalong Schedule:

  1. Fabric & Sourcing (February 10. 2017)
  2. Fitting & Patternhacking  (February 16. 2017)
  3. Cutting & Prep  (February 21. 2017)
  4. All About Darts  (February 23. 2017)
  5. Quilting the Lining  (February 28. 2017)
  6. Invisible Zipper’s  (March 2. 2017)
  7. Waistbands  (March 7. 2017)
  8. Hemming & Fringe  (March 9. 2017)
  9. Show off in the Angela Wolf Facebook Group! 

Sewing Pattern Alterations – Fitting a Jean Pattern for a Round Stomach

Sewing Pattern Alterations – Fitting a Jean Pattern for a Round Stomach

Sewing jeans are really easy once you get the hang of the process, but fitting the pattern can be challenging. The next few posts are going to deal with exactly that, fitting various body shapes. This pattern alteration is needed if you have a fuller stomach, in the old days referred to as an apple shape.  Although, I am not sure where the fruit terms originated from, I really don’t like them.  I would rather be a glass!  Wine glass, red wine glass, martini glass, goblet, water-glass,  I think you get the idea.  It just sounds a little more glamorous than an apple or pear 🙂    Anyway, if you made up a jean muslin and the pattern fit great in the legs, hips, and tush, but you just can’t get that center front closed … here you go:

Fitting a Jean Pattern for a Round Stomach

1.  Tape the front pocket in place.  Start by drawing lines on your pattern (don’t cut yet):

  • Draw a line (green) across the hip and up to the tip of the side seam.
  • Draw 2 lines (purple) perpendicular to the green line,

Angela Wolf Pattern Alteration 12.   Cut along the green line, cutting up to the side seam put NOT through the edge.

Angela Wolf Pattern Alteration 2

3.  Slide the pattern open.  Look what happens, you just gave a little more room in the front tummy area in the width and height of the pattern.

Angela Wolf Pattern Alteration 3

4.  The upper waist curve is too extreme if left like this.  Cut each purple line, down to the green line, but NOT through it.  Slide each line open until the waist curve angles down more like the original pattern.

belt loop30

5.  Redraw a new waistline and center front crotch curve (red line).

Angela Wolf Pattern Alteration 5

If you are having difficulty redrawing the front crotch curve, slide the pattern back together.  Mark the bottom edge of the facing area and trim off the front fly facing.  Follow all the steps and then tape the front facing back in place once the new center front is drawn in, lining up the facing with the marking on the pattern.  Draw a line extending the facing up to the waistline  ( I used this pattern piece, because I knew someone would ask about that).

Here is your new front pattern piece, use this for the front and left, of course one will have a front facing section and the other will not.  This is the same alteration for any pant style when you need a little more room in the tummy area.

How are your jeans coming along for March’s wardrobe challenge?  The judges are almost finished with February’s winners, hope to announce them this weekend.

SPECIAL OFFER FROM WAWAK SEWING!

Looking to stock up on jean sewing supplies – zippers, jean thread, jean buttons … WAWAK Sewing is offering $10 off the next order of $80 or more!  This offer is good until March 31st, use PROMO CODE:  WAGW314 when checking out.  What a great treat for the jean challenge!  Thanks WAWAK! 🙂

That’s all for today 🙂  Sun is shining and snow is melting, thank goodness!!!!

 

 

One Pattern, Many Ways!  #Patternhack

One Pattern, Many Ways! #Patternhack

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This is my new DVD with Threads Magazine and this was a fun one. I took a basic pattern and teach you how to alter one pattern into 4 different styles. Click here for details and behind the scenes photos with the crew!

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