TIPS ON HOW TO SEW FAUX LEATHER!

TIPS ON HOW TO SEW FAUX LEATHER!

leather fall 2014

Leather is a major trend this season and continues on into the spring, yes leather for spring and summer!  Here are a few tips to get you started:

TIP 1. FABRIC

Check the fabric for flaws, especially in faux leather you might find scratches or cuts that you will need to work around when cutting out the pattern pieces.

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Consider the weight and feel of the fabric for the design.  For example a biker jacket will need a thicker fabric than say a peplum style jacket.  Also, squeeze the fabric in your hand and if it has deep creases or wrinkles, that is how it will look after wearing it (better to know now :))

ANGELA WOLF SEWING LEATHER TIPS2ANGELA WOLF SEWING LEATHER TIPS1TIP 2. NEEDLES

Use a Leather Needle in the sewing machine.  Start with a size 12 or 14 for light to medium weight fabric.

Go up to a 16 or 18 for heavier fabric, but be sure to CHECK your sewing machine as to what is the largest size needle it will accommodate.  One of my older machines will only allow up to a size 14.

For sewing faux leather I prefer using a Jean Needle size 14.    If you are having a problem with skipped stitches try this needle.

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When it comes to hand-stitching, standard needles have a difficult time piercing the fabric.  Instead use a Leather Hand Needle, this needle has a triangular point that pierces the fabric.  Just be careful, the tip is REALLY sharp!

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TIP 3: NO PINS

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Just as difficult as it is to pierce leather / faux leather, once you do pierce the fabric the hole is there forever!  Use clips to hold the fabric instead of pins.  They are lightweight and don’t damage the fabric.

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I got these getta grip sewing clips from my friend Paul Gallo.  I met Paul at Craftsy while we were both shooting classes.  He showed me these clips that he designed and I have been a fan ever since.  Awesome guy!  Have you ever met Paul or taken any of his classes?

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FASHION DRAPING: DRESSMAKING BASICS with PAUL GALLO ON CRAFTSY!

 

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FASHION DRAPING: BIAS DESIGN with PAUL GALLO ONLINE CLASS ON CRAFTSY!

TIP 4: TAPING SEAM ALLOWANCES

ANGELA WOLF HOW TO SEW WITH LEATHER9When sewing garments, pressing the seam allowances open with a Tailor’s Clapper is the best option.  Unfortunately with leather, faux leather, vinyl, and suede, even if you safely press the fabric with an iron shoe, the seam allowance will not stay open.  The best solution for securing seam allowances and hemming is either topstitching or leather tape (a special double-sided tape).

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This is how easy it works:

1. Place a strip of LEATHER TAPE in the seam allowance with the sticky side down.

2. Remove paper backing, revealing the other side of the tape.

3. Fold back the seam allowance or hem allowance.

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I use the 1/4″ wide tape for seam allowances and 1/2″ wide tape for hems.  I purchase the tape from WAWAK SEWING and the rolls come 60 yards.  Don’t be caught off guard by the quantity because you will use more than you think and the price is incredible!  Well, this should get you started – next in line is quilting and embroidering faux leather.

Cheers,

Angela Wolf

 

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How to Sew Exposed Zippers in Jeans and Jeggings!

How to Sew Exposed Zippers in Jeans and Jeggings!

With October’s Wardrobe Challenge including zippers, I thought now would be a good time to share a few easy ways to embellish with exposed zippers.

exposed zipe

A fun way to change the look of a pair of jeans is to embellish the leg with an exposed zipper.  Follow along:

angelawolfexposedzip1Supplies Needed:

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Step 1: On the wrong side of the fabric, mark the center of the pant leg (could be front or back, wherever you want the zipper).

If marking an existing pair of jeans, rip out the hem at least 5″ from each side of new mark. Press the fusible interfacing along the newly marked center line.

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Step 2: Mark the hem, hem allowance, and the length of the zipper opening down center of the pant leg.

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Step 3: Determine the width of the zipper opening (depends on the width of the zipper teeth).  Draw in opening, top edge, and then add a triangle from the center cut line to each corner (as shown above).

angelawolfexposedzip5Step 4: Cut along center marking.  Cut each triangle point (if you are worried about the fabric fraying, add Fray Check to the top corners)

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Step 5: Press the seam allowances back and press triangle tip up.

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Step 6: Line up the zipper with the metal teeth in the center of the opening.  Check the placement of the zipper stop and zipper tab.

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Step 7: Fold back the zipper tape and press in place at the hemline.

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Step 8:  Pin zipper in place.

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Step 9:  In this example, I am using standard polyester thread, cotton or silk thread would work too.  Set the sewing machine to a triple stitch and lengthen the stitch length to 4.0.  (Note:  if you don’t have this feature, use denim thread, straight stitch, stitch length 4.0)

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Step 10: Stitch along the edge of the zipper.  Open and close the zipper as needed in order to get the foot by the zipper tab.  angelawolfexposedzip17Step 11:  Notice how I have lined up the edge of the zipper foot with the metal teeth, a very easy to get a straight stitch  … or this would be a great time to utilize the laser vision guide feature on your machine! 🙂

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Step 12: Press up the hem with the tailor’s clapper for a crisp crease.  By the way, did I mention WAWAK Sewing is now carrying my tailor’s clapper!  Yeah!

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Step 13: Hem the jeans and move onto the other leg.

That’s it! Now this is just one quick, easy way to install a hidden zipper.  I will give you some more ideas next time.

Cheers,

Angela Wolf

 

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How to Create Unique Fabric by Sewing Scraps!

How to Create Unique Fabric by Sewing Scraps!

angelawolffringeskirt16I love sweaters and shawls, especially since I am always cold in the air-conditioned restaurants (not that we have needed air conditioning in Michigan this summer!).  Thinking of the wardrobe challenge, sweaters are one of the items that I end up buying. Yes I do know how to crochet, yet trim on a jacket is about as far as that usually ends up. A small knitting machine sits in the corner of the studio (on my bucket list to learn how to use 🙂 ).

Angela Wolf Fringe Skirt 2I was recently sewing a fringe skirt and the tweed scraps falling on the floor reminded me of meeting a women wearing a really cute, long, loosely woven (sweater looking) vest. It was at the annual conference for ASDP, so I had to ask the question that only sewer’s are allowed to ask each other “did you make that?”.  She had indeed! I was really intrigued when she mentioned using water-soluble stabilizer and scraps from her last sewing project  – yes, scraps!

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Below is an example of using scraps from my tweed skirt:

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Angela Wolf how to create fabric

Supplies needed:

WAWAK_SEWING

NOTE: WAWAK sewing has offered my readers a discount for July – yeah! 

Purchase a minimum of $30 and receive 10% off your entire order – Use coupon code WAB714 when checking out (expires July 31st) Thank them when you order, they are the best!  :))

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  • Lay out one layer of water-soluble stabilizer (54″ for a scarf)
  • Randomly place yarn, scraps, hairy yarn, etc.
  • Place another layer of water-soluble stabilizer (same length as the first piece)  on top of the yarns
  • Using long pins,  pin through all the layers

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  • Starting at one end, stitch down the center of the stabilizer, stitching through all the layers.  Be careful not to sew through any pins, stitch all the way to the end. (Draw a straight line down the center if you need something to follow).
  • From the center, align the edge of the presser foot with the first stitched line.  Stitch a second row, and a third, and 4th, until you get to about 1″ from the edge of the stabilizer.  (If your machine has a Laser Vision Guide, like my Brother Dreamweaver, this would be the perfect application!)

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Angela Wolf fabricate lace yarn 42

  • Continue stitching rows along the entire length of the stabilizer until you have the desired width.
  • Turn the fabric and stitch a row from side to side, across the width of the stabilizer.
  • Continue to stitch row after row until the entire length is filled.

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The width of the stitched rows depend on how tight you want the weave of the new fabric or lace.  Just be sure to keep it somewhat tight or the yarns will fall away.

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The next step is easy!  Rinse the fabric panel in warm water and watch the water-soluble stabilizer disappear or throw the fabric in the wash on a hand-wash cycle, again with warm water.

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Above you can see the stabilizer has disappeared and I am left with a loosely woven fabric.  Notice the stitching lines, this is good to keep in mind when you choose the thread color.

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Angela Wolf how to create fabric

 

 

Who would have ever guessed

our scraps

could go so far!

 

 

A few more tips:

  • Throw the fabric in the dryer to soften the hand
  • The stabilizer and yarns shrink up after washing and drying,  keep that in mind if you need a specific length.
  • The more yarn and scraps, the thicker the fabric
  • To make an outfit, stitch all the pieces together before washing out the stabilizer

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This is a great technique to use for June’s Fabricate Challenge – which I extended the deadline until July 31st.

Have you ever tried this?  If so, please share any tips you might have!

Cheers,

Angela WolfWAWAK_SEWING_Logo_Web

 

 

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/ksproductions/review/100618627/b7d8aec7c9]

 

 

 

 

 

Embellishing – Fabricate with Applique!

Embellishing – Fabricate with Applique!

 

Fab-ri-cate (from dictionary.com unabridged – based on the Random House Dictionary)

  1. To make by art or skill and labor; construct
  2. To make by assembling parts or sections
  3. To devise or invent
  4. To fake; forge

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That definition pretty much leaves the door open for ultimate creativity, wouldn’t you say? One idea includes designing your own fabric or altering a fabric into something totally different, which is what I did with the above jacket.

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The fabric used for the applique trimming is a polyester / satin. A lightweight fabric with fabulous drape, perfect for a blouse or lining (both of which I plan to add to jacket).  That fabric, if left alone, would be a nightmare to create appliques or cut-outs, so I fabricated – sounds like a bad word 🙂 !

heat and bondThe trick – Heat N Bond, now available from my favorite place WAWAK Sewing and comes in 5 yard and 35 yard pieces. At first I wasn’t too sure about this stuff, but basically you iron it to the back of the fabric and it makes it easier for you to cut out an applique – especially if you are using the Brother Scan-n-Cut

 

 

 

This is how easy an applique can be:

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  • Choose a design – for the sleeve I enlarged a design already in the scan-n-cut memory.
  • Place the bonded fabric onto the cutting mat (the paper backing on the heat –n-bond makes it easy to stick)
  • Press the start button (told you it was easy!)

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Peel off the backing and place the appliques on the garment.

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Once you have the perfect placement, use a press cloth and press the applique in place.  Notice I attach the appliques before sewing the sleeve together.

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Even though the cut of the scan-n-cut prevents the fabric edges from fraying, I still stitch the applique in place. I choose the blanket stitch and stitched around each applique. That took some time, but it looks great.  Almost looks like leather!

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I followed all those steps for the jacket front and again used a blanket stitch.

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Of course I could cut these appliques by hand, but I really like the fact that all the front pieces are exactly the same! By the way, don’t look too closely at my studio – can you tell I have been working 🙂angela wolf #wardrobechallenge

 

Well, that’s one fun way to fabricate. Have you ever tried appliqueing apparel?

 

Cheers,

Angela Wolf

Compare: Rolled Hem Foot, Ball Hemmer Foot, and Spring Hemmer Foot on an Industrial Sewing Machine

Compare: Rolled Hem Foot, Ball Hemmer Foot, and Spring Hemmer Foot on an Industrial Sewing Machine

How to sew a double fold narrow hem DIY26There are so many sewing machine feet to choose from, it can get overwhelming deciding which foot is best for the job.  Why bother, right?  If using a specific foot for a specific job could drastically cut the sewing time down and offer professional looking results, wouldn’t you want to try?  I sure would.

Home sewing machines usually come with a fabulous manual explaining what each foot is for and a tutorial explaining how to use it.  Industrial machines don’t always offer such advice, at least mine didn’t.  With a 5 page manual, written in a language I don’t speak, I am surprised I got the thing put together in the first place!  I don’t use this machine as frequently as all the others, mainly because it’s loud, doesn’t have a thread cutting feature and I don’t have any accessories for it.  I bought it for speed and that it has.

Scanning the list of additional feet for industrial machines, I found the feet to be are very inexpensive, but again I ran into the issue of which foot is the right foot for the job.  I thought I would start testing some of these feet and share with you my findings.

A Narrow Rolled Hem

I sew a lot of garments with sheer fabrics (especially this months wardrobe challenge;  Dress the Part) and my go-to stitch is usually a narrow rolled hem on the serger – its super fast and looks professional.  But sometimes a rolled hem on the sewing machine would be more appropriate. I found 3 different feet for the industrial machine:

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From left to right: Rolled Hem Foot, Ball Hemmer Foot, Double Fold Spring Hemmer Foot

Rolled Hem Foot

You have probably seen the Rolled Hem Foot, as it comes with most home sewing machines.  This is the only foot I had ever seen used for the job.  It does make a rolled hem easy, but has its challenges as well.  Getting over thick seams can be interesting and sometimes the fabric doesn’t feed evenly.  Of course there are tricks:How to sew a double fold narrow hem DIY35

  • Hold the fabric to the left side of the foot as it feeds into the machine and trimming seam allowances for less bulk.

 

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Results:  A nice rolled hem, I had to use the tweezers to get the fabric started and the rolled hem is a little uneven.  With practice this foot will work.

If you have an industrial machine, you have more options and each offers different results:

Ball Hemmer Foot

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This foot has a plate that covers the front feed dogs allowing the fabric to feed perfectly.  You can see the ball at the tip of the foot, the fabric will roll over that ball as it double folds into a narrow hem.  I must say, I love this foot!  This is how it works:

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  • Feed the fabric into the foot, above the plate.  Notice how the place covers the front feed dogs. Insert the fabric the same way you would for the rolled hem foot.

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  • The fabric folds over the ball.

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  • Hold the fabric a little to the left side of the foot as the fabric feeds into the foot (as shown above).  Stitch.

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  •  Results:  A perfect narrow hem!  This foot offers the easiest rolled hem I have ever tried!  I hardly had to do anything with the fabric except guide it into the foot.  I even sewed at a high-speed and the rolled hem is perfectly even.  A definite A+++++

Double Fold Spring Hemmer Foot

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The “spring” part is what intrigued me about this foot.  You can see the foot looks very similar to the Ball Hemmer Foot, yet there is not a ball.  Instead, there is a movable area that the fabric will go through. Look closely, this is the back of the foot:

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Looking at the left photo first: see the corner touching my finger tip.  When I do nothing with that corner, the opening on the foot remains unchanged (see opening at yellow arrow).

Take a look at the right photo:  Here I have pushed that corner in and the opening gets larger (see yellow arrow).

Now we know what the “spring” means.  This opening adjusts for the thickness of fabric as the fabric flows through.

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  • There is a plate protecting the fabric from the front feed dogs, just like the ball hemmer.  Slide the fabric on the top of the plate.

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  • Again, feed the fabric into the foot and stitch.

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Results:  Another perfect rolled hem!  Just as easy as the ball hemmer foot.

My favorite foot for the rolled hem on silk charmeuse is the Ball Hemmer Foot. The rolled hem was a little thicker than the other two and perfect!

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What about crossing seams and thicker fabrics?  I will test these and more, and let you know the results.  So far both feet are winners!

I also have to check to see if these feet will work on my Brother PQ1500.  The PQ1500 straight stitch machine is just like an industrial machine with speed and ease of use, plus it’s not attached to a large table and easy to move around.  Fingers crosses on that one!  Otherwise, I have my eye on the Brother Industrial Machine used on Project Runway.  Do you have an industrial machine? Have you tried these rolled hem feet?

Cheers!

Angela Wolf

 

 

 

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